Welcome To the WHS Alumni Association!

This is the new Washington Community Schools Alumni Association Website.  We have made a lot of changes to the Alumni Association and have decided to make it free to join as long as you attended or are a graduate of  WHS as well as our friends at WC.   We have a list of active Alumni with up to date information and if you are not on that list you can join the WHS Alumni Association by filling out a form which will add you into our database and sign you up for the Alumni Newsletter.

Spring Time!

When I think of Spring it brings to my mind a time for renewal, blooming flowers and budding trees.  At this time it also means that once again Washington Alumni Page will be renewing itself!  As part of my duties at the Daviess County Economic Development Foundation, Inc. I will be administering this page and updating the database with your updates and changes.  Please bear with me as I make the  transition and try to bring you informative and up to date articles about our Alumni.  With that being said – this will take some input from you The Alumni!  If you have an item that you would like brought to the attention of the Alumni, please send me a note to my email address at njsmith@dcedc.net or give me a call at (812) 254-1500 and Like us over on Facebook under Washington Community Schools Alumni Association.   If you want to receive the newsletter, please follow the links to send us your physical address and email information.  This is an exciting way for all Washingtonians to renew friendships and reconnect and I look forward to this challenge.   Happy Spring!

Natalie (Shake) Smith (78)

Homecoming Memories

It is a fall Friday in Washington Indiana. Southern Indiana weather is known for being extremely fickle, except it seems in September where no matter what it decides it is always beautiful. The leaves are changing, the farmers are beginning their harvest. The days are warm during the sunshine and cool at night. The campfires can be found all over town as people enjoy the crisp evenings and the sound of the secadas sending summer off once again. Anyone who is from Washington knows that this weather means only one thing, football. That familiar game that goes right along with our best fall memories. No matter where life has taken you thus far you can always shut your eyes and remember a Friday Night at Hatchet Hollow. The nights so cold that blankets and hot chocolate still can’t seem to warm you up. You can hear the sound of the band as you pull up. Most of you may remember a game for a great play, a great win, or a close defeat but everyone remembers Homecoming. The homecoming game was always the best game of the year. The spirit week that builds up to it, the float building, the bonfire, the parade and the queen crowning. An annual event that leads to a lifetime of memories. Each year it comes and goes and each year the crown is passed on to a girl for her to treasure forever. All these memories are so unique because they can connect every generation of graduating Hatchets.

I did some research on the annual football homecoming and wanted to share with all Alumni my findings. I went up to the high school and1020

they have on file every yearbook from the opening of the school to the current date. It was quite a trip down memory lane. I looked up the history of the homecoming game and tried as best I could to find who won the queen that year. My research concluded that 1948 was the inaugural homecoming for football. Up to that date all that the yearbook included in regards to “queens” was a May Queen, Prom Queen, and Basketball homecoming queen. In 1948 the yearbook stated “student council voted for the football queen at the beginning of the football season.” The challenge with the earlier years compared to the later years was the yearbook did not always feature a picture of the queen. So due to this research we will call the start of the homecoming tradition 1948. From there it seemed to take the form of what most of us alumni now remember it as today. In the year 1952 the yearbook stated about homecoming “The Annual homecoming, celebrated October 5th began with the traditional bonfire the night before the game and was climaxed with a parade of gaily decorated cars and floats.” This seemed to be the start of the parade and float building contest between the classes. The parade grew every year and is now a local tradition. In the 1983 yearbook it even talked about a class competition of painting windows downtown for the parade.

Since homecoming has been going on for so many years it would be impossible to name every queen in this article. So in the spirit of the year 2013 I thought I would go back and try to find the name of the queens in the years of reunions. (I.E. 1983 etc.) In 1963 Connie Chestnut was named Halloween Queen. In 1983 Stacey Barley won homecoming queen. She was escorted by current Football coach Kelley Brashear. In 1993 Misty Davis was crowned homecoming queen. She was escorted by Hatchet football standout Mickey White.

So whether you live in Washington today or away from your old hometown it can be safe to say you remember homecoming. Pass these memories on to younger generations. Tell them about all the fun you had with homecoming. One thing is for sure, it is a memory that will last you a lifetime.

A Pep Talk from Kid President to You

We all need a little encouragement every now and then. Kid President, knowing this, has put together a video you can play each morning as you wake up or to share with your friend who needs a kick in the right direction. Take a moment and spread some encouragement. “It’s everybody’s duty to give the world a reason to dance.”

“Good judgment…

“Good judgment comes from experience, and often experience comes from bad judgment.” — Rita Mae Brown, author

We have lived this quote all our lives. Share one of your best, most memorable or inspiring stories regarding the quote.

“Preparing today’s Daviess County students for Daviess County’s future”

“Preparing today’s Daviess County students for Daviess County’s future”  

CEO (Creating Entrepreneurial Opportunities) class will start in Daviess County in the fall of 2013. This remarkable class, which is funded and driven by community minded individuals and businesses, will be offered to high school juniors and seniors in Daviess County.

Entrepreneurship education is not about teaching someone to run a business. It is about preparing them to think analytically, respond to dynamic situations and be accountable for their actions. With these skills students will be able to respond to situations they find themselves in the future in a positive manor. The CEO program is a business immersion course. Students are immersed in real life learning experiences with the opportunity to take risks, manage the results, and learn from the outcomes.

The CEO class covers the basics of conceptualizing, starting and running a small business. Concepts such as supply and demand, cost/benefit analysis, competitive advantage, and opportunity recognition are covered. In addition, coursework includes:  innovative thinking strategies, product development, business structure, marketing, financial strategies, record keeping, and preparing an income statement, balance sheet, income and cash flow statements.

Effingham CEO student at the trade show with his products
THE CEO PROGRAM:
  • Is funded by investors
  • Is open to high school juniors and seniors
  • Selects students through a rigorous application process
  • Meets for 90 minutes each day
  • Provides 2 high school credits
  • Utilizes area businesses as classrooms
  • Visits dozens of businesses each year
  • Hosts 50-60 guest speakers each year
  • Emphasizes 21st century learning skills
  • Provides each student the opportunity to start their own business
  • Provides a mentor from the business community for each CEO student
  • Hosts an annual trade show to showcase student businesses

How you can help:

  • Funding: The program is fully funded by sources outside the school system. Funding will be provided by businesses, individuals and non-profits.
  • Volunteering: Are you a local business owner? Open your business and share your experience with our young people through CEO

If you would like to contribute, volunteer or have questions please contact the Daviess County Economic Development Foundation at 812.254.1500, office@dcedc.net, 219 E. Main. St Washington, IN 47501

To see another CEO program that is thriving please visit:www.effinghamceo.com… I promise you will be inspired!

CEO — “It taught us about life”

Please take a moment to watch this video. It is inspiring to see how these students grew and prospered over the year in the CEO class.

Washington High School Class of 1961 Continues to Invest in the WHS Athletic Program

Washington High School Class of 1961 Continues to

Invest in the WHS Athletic Program

Pat Thompson and Bob Arthur graduated from WHS in 1961 and 50 years later they still have a passion for their alma mater.  When their reunion was held recently, the class felt it appropriate to add to the endowment fund named for their deceased classmate, The Bob Miles and Family Fund, a fund of the Daviess County Community Foundation.

This designated fund was created in 2000, in memory of Bob Miles, with an initial gift of $5,000 and has grown to a value of over $13,000.  This newest gift will increase the fund value to over $14,000.  Annual income from the fund benefits the Washington Community School Athletic Department.

Mrs. Thompson stated, “The Class of 1961 is proud to be able to contribute to the Bob Miles and Family Fund.  We felt fortunate to celebrate our 50th Reunion and reminisce about our high school years.  We are pleased to know this contribution will help others at WHS and encourage other classes to contribute to the Daviess Community Foundation.”

The WHS Class of 1961 encourages all graduates of Washington High School to remember to support the extracurricular programs in the school system by making a gift to one of the many endowed funds that benefit those programs.  Gifts can be made through estate planning by bequest or gifts of cash, stocks, bonds, securities and real property.  For assistance with a gift or to have your questions answered, please call your local financial advisor or the Daviess County Community Foundation at 812-254-9354.

 

Our thoughts go out to the the families of the Sandy Hook school community.